The PANDA Experiment will be one of the key experiments at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) which is under construction and currently being built on the area of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. The central part of FAIR is a synchrotron complex providing intense pulsed ion beams (from p to U). Antiprotons produced by a primary proton beam will then be filled into the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) which collide with the fixed target inside the PANDA Detector.

The PANDA Collaboration with more than 420 scientist from 18 countries intends to do basic physics research on various topics around the weak and strong forces, exotic states of matter and the structure of hadrons. In order to gather all the necessary information from the antiproton-proton collisions a versatile detector will be build being able to provide precise trajectory reconstruction, energy and momentum measurements and very efficient identification of charged particles.

The yoke of the PANDA Solenoid Magnet was fully assembled at the steel construction company SET in Novosibirsk.The final tests of doors were done on December 25, 2020 - a nice Christmas present for PANDA.

The assembly of the yoke octants is aided by a star shaped installation tool. After its removal the octants stayed in place with minimal deviation. All parts are surveyed with a laser tracker employing fixed fiducial marks even during the assembly process which facilitates the whole operation providing much better precision. No mechanical stoppers are used, as their precision would be too low. 

The four doors, two downstream and two upstream, are bolted to the yoke in their closed position. Before opening the doors the bolts are unfastened and the doors are lowered to the sliding rails resting then on heavy weight rollers. The 22t door wings were opened sliding on the rollers with a friction of only about 0.5% - two persons were able to move one wing with a simple manual winch. In the final configuration BINP will equip the doors with hydraulic jacks and actuators, which were not part of the deliverables of SET. Documentation for the completion of the factory acceptance procedure is under way.

The yoke was again disassembled and the parts will be transported to BINP were they will be stored in two halls waiting for the assembly of the complete magnet for testing and field measurements at BINP. The octants and downstream doors will be kept in a climate controlled hall to avoid any unwanted corrosion within the gaps. The outer frame can be stored at simpler conditions.

Currently the cryostat of the superconducting solenoid is in production. At the same time the production of the superconducting wire is in preparation. The assembly of the entire magnet at BINP will take place next year and allow first tests and finally a complete field mapping. For this operation the cryogenic plant of the KEDR magnet at BINP will be employed to provide the necessary supply of liquid Helium for refrigeration.

Walter Ikegami AnderssonDr. Walter Ikegami Andersson (Photo: WIA/private) has received the Panda PhD Prize 2020 for his doctoral thesis "Exploring the Merits and Challenges of Hyperon Physics with PANDA at FAIR" at GSI, FAIR, and the Uppsala University. His doctoral advisor was Prof. Dr. Karin Schönning from the Uppsala University. The award was announced by the spokesman of the Panda Collaboration, Klaus Peters from GSI, at the most recent Online Panda Collaboration meeting. 

The Panda Collaboration has awarded the PhD Prize once per year since 2013 in order to honor the best dissertation written in connection with the Panda Experiment. In his dissertation, Physicist Walter Ikegami Andersson studied hyperon production and reactions within the Panda detector, which is being built at the FAIR accelerator facility.

The Panda Collaboration awards the PhD Prize to specifically honor students’ contributions to the Panda project. Candidates for the PhD Prize are nominated by their doctoral advisors. In addition to being directly related to the Panda Experiment, the nominees’ doctoral degrees must have received a rating of “very good” or better. Up to three candidates are shortlisted for the award and can present their dissertations at the Panda Collaboration meeting. The winner is chosen by a committee that is appointed for this task by the Panda Collaboration.

Antoni WossDr. Antoni Woss (Photo: AW/private) has received the Panda Theory PhD Prize 2020 for his doctoral thesis "The scattering of spinning hadrons from lattice QCD". His doctoral advisor was Prof. Dr. Christopher Thomas from the University of Cambridge. The award was announced by the spokesman of the Panda Collaboration, Klaus Peters from GSI, at the most recent Online Panda Collaboration meeting. 

The Panda Collaboration has awarded the Theory PhD Prize for the second time to honor the best theory dissertation written in connection with the Panda Experiment. In his dissertation, Dr. Woss has demonstrated extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge and his thesis breaks new ground in lattice calculations of hadron spectroscopy. He developed and then applied state-of-the-art lattice QCD methods to determine precisely the properties and interactions of hadronic resonances, in particular for hadrons with non-zero spin, overcoming conceptual and technical obstacles that to date have hindered such lattice QCD calculations. Dr Woss' thesis includes a number of "firsts" - the first-ever lattice QCD extraction of the mixing between dynamically-coupled partial waves and the first lattice coupled-channel calculation involving hadrons with non-zero spin. He also developed an elegant general way to present scattering amplitudes involving an arbitrary number of coupled channels - a significant result on its own. The body of work in this truly excellent thesis now enables lattice QCD calculations which are directly relevant for PANDA's planned investigations of excited and exotic hadron resonances, including for any potential hybrid and tetraquark states.

The Panda Collaboration awards the PhD Prize to specifically honor students’ contributions to the Panda project. Candidates for the PhD Prize are nominated by their doctoral advisors. In addition to being directly related to the Panda Experiment, the nominees’ doctoral degrees must have received a rating of “very good” or better. Up to three candidates are shortlisted for the award and can present their dissertations at the Panda Collaboration meeting. The winner is chosen by a committee that is appointed for this task by the Panda Collaboration.

First test assembly of the PANDA Solenoid Yoke at SET in Novosibirsk. BINP performed precise measurements with laser trackers to check all relevant dimensions. After some necessary corrections the yoke will be finalized and painted. Then it will be assembled at BINP for the installation of the cryostat, coil and control dewar for tests starting 2022.

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